presidents

 

Dr. Paul Armes
Dr. Paul Armes
(2001-present)


The current president, Armes has led the university to open an additional campus in Altus, Ok la., and on the Internet, the Virtual Campus, now nearly the largest in the WBU system. Enrollment exceeds 6,000 system wide and construction is nearly complete for the Pete and Nelda Laney Student Activities Center.

 

 

Dr. Wallace Davis

Dr. Wallace E. Davis, Jr.
(1991-2000)


Davis' administration was marked by growth in fundraising, reduction of debt and the completion of the Mabee Learning Resources Center. New campuses were added in Phoenix and Sierra Vista, Ariz., and at Clovis and Albuquerque, N.M. and a partnership began with the Kenya Baptist Theological College. A new baseball field and a remodeled Van Howeling building were also completed, and enrollment exceeded 5,000 system wide.

 

 

Dr. Lanny Hall

Dr. Lanny Hall
(1989-1991)

Dr. Hall spent a short tenure at Wayland, but he holds the distinction of being the only individual to serve as president of three Texas Baptist universities. He left WBU for Hardin-Simmons and now serves as president of Howard Payne University.


 

Dr. Glenn Barnett

Dr. Glenn Barnett
(interim 1987-1989)

Barnett served as interim, helping to restructure the debt and lay a foundation for a stronger university for the next leader. He helped institute the Faculty Assembly.

 

Dr. David Jester
Dr. David Jester
(1981-1987)

Jester oversaw the move from college to university status and the addition of the McClung University Center, and additional campuses opened in San Antonio and at Anchorage and Fairbanks, Alaska.

 

 

Dr. Roy C. McClung

Dr. Roy C. McClung
(1963-1981)


A pastor, McClung led another great physical expansion at WBU, adding dorms, Harral Auditorium, the science building, Hutcherson Physical Education Center, the museum, Brown Chapel and the remodeled Nunn building. Enrollment topped 1,000 for the first time, and external campuses opened in Lubbock, Wichita Falls, Amarillo and Hawaii.

 

Dr. A. Hope Owen

Dr. A. Hope Owen
(1953-1963)


Coming from the pastorate of First Baptist Church in Plainview, Owen helped develop a master plan for new buildings and university growth. Three women's dorms, a men's dorm, the library, Bible building, married student apartments and the Home Life building were added during his tenure and full accreditation was secured.

 

Dr. James W. Marshall

Dr. James W. "Bill" Marshall
(1947-1953)


A forward thinker, Marshall led the university to reach out internationally and expanded to a four-year college in 1948. He led the school in 1951 to voluntarily admit black students, making WBU the first four-year liberal arts college in the former Confederate South to do so.

 

Dr. George W. McDonald

Dr. George W. McDonald
(1924-1947)


McDonald stepped into the presidency from the role of math professor and dean and was the longest tenured president. In his 23 years, McDonald oversaw the addition of the Nunn Gymnasium and helped Wayland weather the storms of the Great Depression and the loss of all financial resources. He and the faculty volunteered to work without a paycheck until the economic situation turned around.

 

Dr. Elmer B. Atwood

Dr. Elmer B. Atwood
(1919-1923)


Atwood came to WBC from New Mexico and helped address Wayland's debt and expand its appeal to students beyond the Plains of Texas, especially in New Mexico, which did not have a Baptist school.

 

Dr. R.E.L. Farmer

Dr. R.E.L. Farmer
(1916-1918)


A pastor as well, Farmer helped grow enrollment to 300 and WBC began offering summer classes. He resigned to raise money for the university but died a few months later in the influenza epidemic that swept the world.

 

Dr. Orren L. Hailey

Dr. Orren L. Hailey
(1915-1916)


Coming to Wayland from the pastorate of First Baptist Church in Plainview, Hailey helped grow the junior college before returning to the pastorate.

 

Dr. I. E. Gates
Dr. I. E. Gates
(1909-1915)


The first president, Gates was responsible for raising funds that covered the school's indebtedness for the main administrative building, which was completed in 1911. He was also instrumental in recruiting students, employees and donors for the fledgling Baptist school.