TIPS FROM OTHER PARENTS

  • Make copies of your child's social security card, driver's license, insurance cards, and shot record. You will use these often during your child's college experience.

  • Keep an accordant file will tax returns, copies of social security, driver's license, and insurance card, financial aid information, and any other important papers that pertain to your child's education. Keeping in one central place with save time and frustration.

  • Open a joint banking account for your student. It will be easy to transfer money into the account quickly. A debit card is taken almost everywhere in Plainview.

  • As soon as you have a completed your tax return, fill out the FAFSA. (Free Application For Federal Student Aid - http://www.fafsa.ed.gov). Financial Aid will not be able to do their job until this is completed. Mark your calendar a year in advance to remind you of when to start filling out the online application.

  • Make several copies of the completed FAFSA. Be sure to write down your student's pin number and your pin number. Put all this information in a safe place. You will be asked to use the pin numbers every year you will out the FAFSA.

  • Stay on top of financial aid issues, they can be complex and have strict deadlines.

  • When sending care packages include a gift card. There is something empowering about a gift card. There is always a need for food in the dorm or personal items to purchase. (Wal-Mart, CVS, United Grocery Store)

  • Make sure your student knows where the nurse is and how to contact her, even in the middle of the night in case of an emergency.

  • Get a copy of your student's schedule. Keep it on your desk and on the refrigerator at home. Call them in between classes. You'll have something to talk about, because you know exactly where they have just been.

  • Focus on the new experiences and friends your child is making instead of how much you miss them.

  • Make sure your student is relationally connected, i.e. he/she is talking about friends, church group, choir, sports team, whatever – a real clue as to whether they are assimilating or not.

  • Be prepared to move your student at least once (usually twice) during each year of their college experience.  They (your student ---your bundle of joy) will feel it is their duty and responsibility to keep you physically fit while building your tolerance and patience levels. We owe so much to them for this thoughtfulness and kindness.  This is sent by parents of three college aged children (one of which has graduated……HALLELJAH!!)  By our calculations, we have helped our precious ones move approximately 20 times and anticipate the probability of at least 4 more moves!!  Good Luck! 

  • Encourage your student to live in the dorm for one year.  This allows them to interact with other students that may turn out to be really good friends.

  • Encourage you student to get involved in at least one organization.  Being busy with an organization helps them stay involved in school and keeps them from getting homesick.